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Civic Engagement

About the Campaign

We come into the 2016 electoral landscape off of a mid-term cycle where drop-off among the New American Majority voters was significant. For example, research conducted by Latino Decisions found that Latino turnout in 2014 was significantly lower than 2010, and well below statewide averages. In 2014, if Latino voters had turned out at a rate similar to the statewide average as they did in 2010, an additional 276,000 Latino votes would have been cast. That is a significant amount of political power being left out of the democratic process. We know that individuals are more likely to turn...

We come into the 2016 electoral landscape off of a mid-term cycle where drop-off among the New American Majority voters was significant. For example, research conducted by Latino Decisions found that Latino turnout in 2014 was significantly lower than 2010, and well below statewide averages. In 2014, if Latino voters had turned out at a rate similar to the statewide average as they did in 2010, an additional 276,000 Latino votes would have been cast. That is a significant amount of political power being left out of the democratic process. We know that individuals are more likely to turn out if they are contacted in person by trusted messengers, and also if they are contacted about an issue that they care deeply about. Yet, we continue to fail to maximize and mobilize the democratic voice of marginalized communities. 

Despite the growing demographic shifts towards the New American Majority, most approaches to elections have not changed. Every four or two years, tens of millions of dollars are spent to register voters and drive turnout, more recently with a slightly increased focus on communities of color, young people, and unmarried women. However, in many communities of color this will be extent of their interaction with the electoral process until the next election cycle. This type of engagement makes democratic participation transactional and leaves little capacity and infrastructure for civic engagement and movement building beyond elections.  

CPD believes that in order to build and exercise sustainable power, we must develop programs that both increase participation in the immediate election cycle and strengthen our infrastructure and power on the ground to drive impact year-round. Elections create opportunities to use voter engagement to begin developing not only habitual voters, but also, stronger community leaders who will drive organizing campaigns and hold elected officials accountable after elections. During this election cycle our partner organizations will engage millions of voters and households - the vast majority of them young people, people of color, and working-class families. 

CPD’s priority will be to support our partners in running high-impact, data-driven political programs that lead with issues with a focus on driving turnout among the Black, Latino, Asian Pacific Islander, and working class voters.  In 2016, CPD and partners will target over three-quarters of a million voters to turnout and elevate their voice in the democratic process.